Category: Me, Myself & I

Uncle Duties in Kyoto

Single and unattached uncles often times are the cooler and more amiable versions of a father. They are often the type of human beings who initiate messy-yet-fun activities that parents dread or wouldn’t dream of doing with their kids.  They are the ones who permit impish and playful pursuits of youngsters that nervous or impatient parents would not want to do.

Since single and unattached uncles are often times financially stable and obligations and responsibilities are few and are often far between.  Thus, they even become cooler because they have the money to splurge. 

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And since uncles are older and experienced, they would often be the ones that kids would run to in case they could not discuss stuffs to their parents.  They can give worthy and wicked advises that kids need not necessarily follow.  And in case nieces and nephews refuse or won’t listen, nothing changes.  Kids not following advises is not going to be an issue to cool uncles.  Cool uncles remains cool uncles.     

Though my monster pamangkins (translation: nieces and nephews) would totally disagree, I would like to believe that I am that type of an uncle.  And while my family had a short vacation in Japan, I further my being a neat praiseworthy uncle by accompanying 3 of my monster pamangkins around the marvelous sites of Kyoto and the grounds of the massive Osaka Castle.

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miggy
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kate
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luis
kyoto station with pamangkins
i had a blast!

Though I was there slave photographer, I had a blast with these three!

Saludo ako kung ikaw ay isang kul Tito!

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Stepping Into the Good Olden Days of Osaka

Only now that I realized that in the past 7 times that I have travelled to Japan, only few times did I went to a public art museum.  Reason maybe is because Japan in itself is one whole country of a public museum.  Everything you see, touch and feel seem worthy of being preserved, collected and exhibited.

When I go to a foreign country, I often set aside a day to visit either an art, cultural or historical museum.  I call it my “cultural day”.  A day when my soul is fed with art, history and culture.  But being in Japan, everyday seem to be a “cultural day”.

LIFE doesn’t come with an instruction manual, it comes with a MOTHER!

 

Though it is my 8th journey to Japan, this visit is still something different.  It is because I got to go and check on an actual museum.  And what is so unique about it is that I myself seem to be part of the museum’s exhibit.

While my nieces and nephews settled to go to Osaka’s Universal Studios, accompanied by one of my nieces, I, my sisters and Nengkoy went to Osaka Museum of Housing & Living.

super fun dressing up!
i love this shot!
what’s cooking?
gabi na! hahaha!

 

i call this the “rabbies shot”! hahaha!

The whole museum is a replica of an old Japanese town, specifically during Japan’s Edo period.  The cool thing about this museum is you got to rent and wear clothes of people during that era.  Thus, visitors donned in kimonos and yukatas can interactively feel how it really was 200 years ago in Osaka.

Adding up the modern Japanese technology, the lighting and sound simulations of the whole museum would shift, in which visitors would get to witness how it is to be during early morning dawn, daytime and nighttime period of the Edo era.   The awesome feeling was like stepping into  the good olden days of Osaka!

super fun peeping back into some japanese history…

Ang galing!

Swim Naked

When you got old, when you got poor.  When you got sick, when you got hungry.  When you got lost, when you got heartbroken.  These are the low moments in our lives when we would know the true people who cares for us. 

Like what Warren Buffet said, “It is only when the tide goes out that you discover who’s been swimming naked”

Lumangoy ng naka-bomba!

A Fine Story Behind A Fine Sign Pen

Are you like me in which the attractiveness of my own signature is dependent on the quality and refinement of the pen I use?  I asked this because I am impressed and enjoy using my present sign pen.  Unfortunately, my present pen (pictured below) does not seem to have a label.

And it seems that I can no longer obtain the same pen in case the present one runs out of its ink.  Reason being, I got this pen from a boy who sells various ball-points, markers and pen on a moving bus.  If in New York subways there are young students who sells chocolates and snacks inside a moving train, here in the Philippines, there is a young boy who sells cheap sign pens and ballpens inside a moving bus.

On a public commute to the City of Manila from a weekend adventure in Villa Escudero in Quezon Province, a shy-looking young boy hopped up our bus and started distributing a note to all the passengers. The message indicated on the note states that the young lad is selling cheap ballpens and that the proceeds of his earnings shall be used for his schooling expenses.

I opted to buy one priced at twenty pesos (less than 40 cents in US$) and got to pick the green colored pen then return the note he handed earlier.  My colleague MJ, on the other hand, actually handed 50 pesos (US$1) to the young dude after reading the note and opted not to get any pen.  She however did not return the note the boy distributed and instead kept it inside her bag.  She told me that she is to show the note to her daughter and tell her daughter about our encounter with this pleasant-looking young boy.

And every time I use this sign pen I am reminded that it was the most meaningful 20-peso spending I did that day.

Ka-aya-aya ang piling!

Villa Escudero Waterfalls Was All Mine!

It’s been several times that I have been to Villa Escudero and with all those repeated moments that I have been there I always fail to have my photo right at its famous waterfalls.  Maybe it’s because in my previous visits, I feel discouraged because this prominent spot at Villa Escudero is always full of people trying to have their selfies or pictures taken.  There is always a frustrating photo bomber lurking within your camera frame.

But with my recent revisit, I made sure that I not only be taken a picture with, I also made sure that the whole waterfalls is all mine!

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magic!

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Here’s a great tip for those who are planning to visit Villa Escudero and have the waterfalls all by yourself.  All you need to have is your mobile phone, a gorilla pod (a camera tripod) and an alarm clock.  First thing you need to do is to set the alarm clock the night before you plan to have your awesome photos taken.  Set it at 6:00 AM and make sure to wake up at 6:00 AM.

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don’t go chasin’ waterfalls…
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i love this shot!

Then early in the morning bring your camera and tripod to the waterfalls.  Set it up and have awesome photos and videos taken!  Be there while everyone are having their breakfast.  Be there before all tourists flock the site.

Ang Bongga! Mag-effort sa ‘ngalan ng pikchur!

Twenty Dollars Got My Middle Fingers Rise Up

I got my middle fingers up because according to the majority of the supposedly most honorable men and women in my country (the Philippines), the cost of keeping and upholding human rights for the next year is worth one thousand pesos (which is equivalent to US$20).  This rubbish decision by Philippine Congress is amidst the pandemic extra judicial killings that is going on in my country.

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I have been silent and have been suppressing my feelings of disgust towards how my country is now being run.  There is nothing to be proud of and nothing to celebrate about this dimwit decision.  Actually, this decision by the sloppy Philippine Congress is nothing but shameful!  #GiveMyTaxToCHR

Nakakalungkot at nakakahiya.

I Think I Love Taipei

People in New York are called New Yorkers while folks in Rio De Jainero are known as Cariocas. Here in Manila we are called Manileños while those in Sydney are called Sydneysiders.  Residents of Paris are called Parisians while those born and raised in Tokyo are called Edokko.

But what about the people in Taipei?  How do they call themselves as a people?  I know that Taipei is located in Taiwan and its people are known as Taiwanese.  But what about the specific state of Taipei? What is their demonym?  Strangely, even google doesn’t seem to have an answer.

taipei 101 a
iconic tower!
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super fun
neil, ngkoy & gaying at cks 2017
with nengkoy  and sister
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nengkoy with the cks guard

But no matter what the world would call their citizens, one thing is for sure, I was very impressed by the Taipei people’s character.  Prior to visiting Taipei, I plucked and gathered a lot of tolerance and courage from my garden of compassion so as to bring it with me in Taipei.  It is because I thought that the people of Taipei were the same and as typical as that of their mainland counterpart.  But my encounters with their locals were so surprising all positive.  They were unexpectedly polite, well-mannered and very helpful.

And aside from the people, the food and character, their city was surprisingly clean, modern and very organized.  It’s a friendly city for a non-Chinese speaking person like me.  Their hero (Chang Kai Shek), who paved the way for the molding of Taipei character, democracy and economic development was even someone to be proud of.

neil, ngkoy & gaying at taipei train
groupie inside a quiet train
neil at cks 2017
strike a pose!
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hello taipei
neil at taipei 2017 a
yeba!

May they be termed Taipeinese, Taipei-siders, Taipeian or other names, Taipei people were surprisingly impressive!  I think I love Taipei.

Ay lab Taypey!