Fenesta Ca Lucive: A Touching Lullaby

Have you ever been introduced to a poignant and beautiful lullaby while reading a novel?  And have you ever tried searching and listening to that music inscribed in such book?  I was and I did.

Thanks to young Elio, the main character in the book Call Me By Your Name, for he introduced me to Fenesta Ca Lucive, an old, sad and touching Neapolitan song.  As soon as I finished reading the pages where Fenesta Ca Lucive was penned, I dropped the book and took my Ipad.  I searched the song and this is what it was… 

Chiagneva sempe ca durmeva sola
Mo dorme co’ li muorte accompagnata
She always wept because she slept alone,
Now she sleeps among the dead

While listening to this beautiful lullaby, I took the book and re-read the portion where it was portrayed.  The music gave a different sensation.  It suddenly gave the novel I was reading a brighter color.  Though, I don’t understand a single word of the song, the music is so haunting, it felt like I was in the streets of Rome witnessing the tenderness, passion and the imminent despair of the main character.

Kakaiba yung piling! Ang galing!

Call Me By Your Name: A Beautiful Poetic Narrative

I guess I’m a bit hard to please when it comes to reading and finishing a book.  After reading some of the most beautiful, exhilarating and awe-inspiring books in the past, there has been three (3) books that I started reading but – due to boredom – eventually dropped and chose not to finish it.  Thus, a book will therefore be very good if I would be able to digest and finish it up to its last word.

superb!

I was actually a little afraid that I would not be able to finish a book anymore, but Call Me By Your Name by Andre Aciman erased that!  It was the book that stirred my hard-to-please taste.  Call Me By Your Name is not just a stirring and fascinating story, it is actually a beautiful poetic narrative about a person’s coming-of-age reflections, desires and contemplations.

I actually envy the writer Andre Aciman for he got the talent, gift and faculty in crafting delightful words and weaving beautiful thoughts together.  Aciman was so impressive, he was able to bring readers into the major character’s heart.  That is why the joy and sadness of Elio (the major character) are the reader’s joy and sadness.  Elio’s passion and pain were the reader’s passion and pain.  And I was so into it, Elio’s heartbroken was my heartbroken!  And when I finished and read the last word of this superb novel, I noticed myself grasping for some air.

I refuse to give any spoiler!  All I can say is that the book was so good, I didn’t want to finish! Now, Call Me By Your Name sits among the top ten books that I have successfully finished.

Nakakabuntong hininga!

The Association of Small Bombs: It is so good, I am pissed!

As soon as I finished reading the latest book I have just read, I texted my nephew this:

translation: I am appalled, I am annoyed, I am pissed with you! The book I borrowed from you is so good! Damn it! Hahaha!
translation:
I am appalled, I am annoyed, I am pissed with you! The book I borrowed from you is so good! Damn it! Hahaha!
powerful!
powerful!

It is because Luis, my nephew, was the one responsible why I got hold of a copy of The Association of Small Bombs written by Karan Mahajan.  Last Friday night, while we were at Nengkoy’s house, Luis bragged and showed me this book along with another novel whom he is excited to read.  He boasted that The Association of Small Bombs has been named Best Book of 2016 by Esquire, Time and Vulture.com.

Exploiting my being an elder to my nephew, I pestered Luis that I should instead be the first one to read it.  I eventually brought the book with me in my house and Luis, helpless and all, settled on reading the other novel.

And just this afternoon, like a time bomb, I could not hold on to my grief and wretchedness after reading this powerful novel.  I have to have an outlet and that is decanting these emotions through a text message.  I texted and blamed Luis on why I was feeling what I was feeling.  Hahaha!

me and my monster nephew, luis
me and one of my monster nephews, luis

This is the first book that I read this year and this book was so effective in zoning me out to a different level of sadness.  It is one of the most compelling books that I have read.  It is so captivating I finished the book in one and a half days.

The Association of Small Bombs will bring you to the dynamic insight on the effects of terrorism as well as to the unimaginable high emotions of being a victim of bombings and radicalism.  This book will make you discern that no one wins in terrorism.  And may you be the perpetrator or the target of a bombing plot, everybody ends up being a victim.

But seriously, I am so thankful to my nephew Luis for bringing into my life’s sphere this brilliant novel.  I will indeed return it to him so that he be able to understand the encompassing tragedy brought about by terrorism, extremism, radicalism or whatever synonymous word that people may associate terrifying bombings with.

Super galinng! Masoli na nga ang librong yan!

All The Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

I enjoyed it sooo much!  It is beautifully written. It’s as joyful as it is heartbreaking.  All The Bright Places by Jennifer Niven is a book that knocked me off my ass!

captivating!
captivating!

I loved how the author painted the characters Theodore and Violet.  Their characters worked so well together.  They were so opposite yet so the same.  Their characters were presented in a beautiful interwoven style just the way I liked it. You get to see, hear and feel both of their perspectives.

You will get so invested in the characters of both Theodore and Violet.  It is a book that will make you fall in love with these two and – without giving away anything – will later reduce you to tears and will make you badly miss them.

I particularly got so captivated by the character of Finch.  I love the way he adopts a persona.  Though perceived by others as someone who is weird, he can become somebody that is either a slightly different version if not a better version of himself.  Add to that is his adoring wit.  He could be very funny and quirky yet so deep, romantic and definitely full of sense and essence.  He is such a unique character every reader I guess would be snuck up and drawn in by his passionate persona.

such beautiful words...
such beautiful words…

All The Bright Places is one of those few stories that would slowly and gently grab your heart as in like you have fallen so much deeply in love.  And yet after sometime it will crush you into emotional bits and pieces.  I was not happy with the ending but it is one ending that is a must to make this book a remarkable book.  The heartbreaking twists at the end parts of the story would make you get to love it.

Somehow, I think 5 stars aren’t enough for such a remarkable book.  I will definitely give it as many stars as those shining in the entire universe because All The Bright Places truly deserves them.

Nakaka…!

Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami

translated by jay rubin
translated by jay rubin

Norwegian Wood is the first Murakami novel I’ve read.  And this will certainly not be the last.

Each of the character in Norwegian Book were so distinct, so life-like and were so richly depicted.  The author has a unique way in making you feel how each character truly felt.  It has a very nostalgic feel to it yet the interactions in the book seem so real.  Murakami’s words create perfect pictures without becoming too descriptive.  And the thoughts he pulls out of the reader tend to suck the energy out for a little while.

And though the story is simple, the range of emotions the characters experience seem so complex making this book so elegant and sophisticated.  At first it seemed like a normal beautiful love story, until you reach the story’s dark spin to it.  The ending actually left me feeling like my intelligence was raped or I was mind-fucked by Murakami.

Because of Murakami’s beautiful way with imagery perhaps the best thing about Norwegian Wood is that it is open to the reader’s interpretation.  I doubt if two people after reading Norwegian Wood will settle with the same interpretation of the events that transpired and the characters’ respective motivations.

Payb stars… ay layk it…

House Rules by Jodi Picoult: A Worthy Story With Sloppy Ending

house rules by jodi picoultI am  glad that my first Jodi Picoult is the House Rules.  For one, there are only few novels I have that in which the story was written from the point of view of several characters including a boy with Asperger’s Syndrome, his brother, his mother, his lawyer and a detective.

The way the story ended for me was a bit of a disappointment.  It looks unfinished.  When I read the last page I thought there must be some page missing I even checked on the binding of the manuscript to see if some page were torn out.  Imagine after spending hundreds of pages learning and understanding the characters all of a sudden the author stopped and decided to abruptly end the story without patching up how an equally complicated scenario would be settled.

Nevertheless, the writing technique of Picoult is impressive.  Her switching into different characters after each chapter and her portrayals of these personalities in the novel were impeccable.  I particularly liked the character of Theo.  I liked him because he is the most human being in the story.  If Picoult would write a novel that concentrates more on this young man’s life, I would definitely read it.

Also, full credit should be given to Picoult for the superior research she has done on the topics the story tackled – asperger’s syndrome, autism, psychiatry, forensic science, law, litigation procedures, etc.  And the way she presented the details of these striking topics were also very impressive.  She was like peeling off the skins of an onion meticulously layer by layer.

Though with such a sloppy ending, House Rules nailed it in terms of being informative, entertaining and insightful.  I definitely was entertained because I would just toss it away (when my Asperger’s syndrome attacks) and would not finish reading it if I did not enjoyed it.

Nakakareleyt ako dun sa bida! Hahaha!

Looking For Alaska Is Inspiring

looking for alaskaThis is the second John Green book that I read this month.  Though it’s not as strong and powerful as The Fault In Our Stars, Looking for Alaska nevertheless is an inspiring work about life and death, about loyalty and friendship, and about the choices we must inevitably make during the tender ages of our life.

I like this book because of its uniqueness of not having a villain or bad person in the story.  Though this book is generally introspective, brooding and contemplative, the story is interspersed with fun hilarious episodes and laughable conversations among characters.

Aside from having normal human beings as characters, the compelling forces that made this novel very meaningful are the literary allusions.  John Green definitely was right in the money for every mention of dead yet admired and/or significant individuals’ last spoken words being mixed through the storyline.

Two connotations referenced in the book that truly stirred me were Francois Rabelais’ “The Great Perhaps” and Simon Bolivar’s “How will I ever get out of this labyrinth?”  Readers at the end will definitely be left with something to think about regarding these two rousing allusions.  I won’t explain further for I don’t want this write-up to be some silly spoiler.

Overall, this book is excellent and is well worth my time.

Eksayting nga naman malaman kung ano “Ang Dakilang Marahil”